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kateoplis:

Brenton Little

photojojo:

Aerial photographs are easy enough to accomplish once you find a pilot, but what do you do when the area you want to capture is so remote that no pilot is willing to fly there? 

Well if you’re George Steinmetz, you use a paraglider of course, which is essentially a motorized parachute. George compiled all of his stunning prints into a book titled Desert Air

National Geographic Photographer uses Paraglider to Capture the Desert

via NYT Lens

thescienceofreality:

A Henge Beneath in Streaky Bay, South Australia by Dylan Toh & Marianne Lim
“These granite inselberg rock formations arise abruptly from a paddock of sheep with open surrounds. On this cloudless night, I had one hour between sunset and moonrise to take as many exposures of the milky way high overhead. I was fortunate that there was enough time to trial a few compositions in the dark before settling on this panorama of 14 vertical images.”

thescienceofreality:

A Henge Beneath in Streaky Bay, South Australia by Dylan Toh & Marianne Lim

These granite inselberg rock formations arise abruptly from a paddock of sheep with open surrounds. On this cloudless night, I had one hour between sunset and moonrise to take as many exposures of the milky way high overhead. I was fortunate that there was enough time to trial a few compositions in the dark before settling on this panorama of 14 vertical images.”

photojojo:

Cy Kuckenbaker compiled over 5 hours of footage to create this stunning time-lapse of landings at San Diego International Airport. 
Five Hours of Airplane Landings in a 30-Second Time-Lapse
via Booooooom

photojojo:

 compiled over 5 hours of footage to create this stunning time-lapse of landings at San Diego International Airport. 

Five Hours of Airplane Landings in a 30-Second Time-Lapse

via Booooooom

photojojo:

Aerial photographs are easy enough to accomplish once you find a pilot, but what do you do when the area you want to capture is so remote that no pilot is willing to fly there? 

Well if you’re George Steinmetz, you use a paraglider of course, which is essentially a motorized parachute. George compiled all of his stunning prints into a book titled Desert Air

National Geographic Photographer uses Paraglider to Capture the Desert

via NYT Lens

photojojo:

These photos by Stephanie Jung are actually multiple-exposure prints!

Awesome Multiple-Exposure Cityscapes

via Inspiration Grid

landscapelifescape:

 Malga Costa Tree Cathedral, Val de Sella, Italy
artwork by Giuliano Mauri  Arte Sella

landscapelifescape:

Malga Costa Tree Cathedral, Val de Sella, Italy

artwork by Giuliano Mauri  Arte Sella

atavus:

Yu Yamauchi - Dawn

photojojo:

Kamil Tamiola aptly describes himself as an “adventure photographer.” We’ve seen his stunning sky portraits before, but now he’s put together a behind the scenes video to detail how he creates these amazing photographs! 

Let There Be Light - Behind the Scenes of Magical Night Photography!

via Reddit | DIY Photography

myampgoesto11:

Kees Veenenbos: Mars

Dutch artist Kees Veenenbos is one of the leading digital artist who creates amazing renderings of space and planetary landscapes. His work has been featured in National geographic on numerous occasions, as well as being used in several NASA’s projects. In fact, the majority of his Mars digital elevation models have been used by NASA depicting beautiful images of Mars, including creative concept renderings with water and ice present on the Martian surface.

[via Empty Kingdom]

atavus:

Matthew Franklin
Website | Flickr

atavus:

Matthew Franklin

Website | Flickr

landscapelifescape:

Moscow, Russia
Moscow morning by Sergey Shaposhnikov

landscapelifescape:

Moscow, Russia

Moscow morning by Sergey Shaposhnikov

discoverynews:

Birds-of Paradise Evolved in Lost Worlds

For the first time, all 39 known birds of paradise are documented in a single volume that reveals the beauty and unusual behavior of these unique birds, which evolved in remote and rugged parts of New Guinea, the Maluku Islands and eastern Australia.

more birds…

discoverynews:

it’s like a disney movie meets real life.

i’m freaking out right now.

but that could also be all the caffeine i’ve consumed today.

i should stop typing.

look at the bears!

by Paul Nicklen - White Black Bear

Have you ever seen a black bear that was actually white? Known as the spirit bear or the Kermode bear, this revered and rare creature is found almost exclusively in the a moss-draped rainforest in British Columbia, Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest.

For National Geographic’s August issue, photographer Paul Nicklen captured the spirit bear in all its glory. With a population of only about 400 to 1,000, the white bear is a rare sight to behold.

Just how do they get that color? “Scientists know how black bears are born white. They’re just not sure why,” says Bruce Barcott of National Geographic. “The phenomenon, known as Kermodism, is triggered by a recessive mutation at the MC1R gene, the same gene associated with red hair and fair skin in humans. To be born white, a bear must inherit the mutation from both parents. The parents themselves don’t have to be white. They just need to carry the recessive mutation. So it’s not uncommon for white bears to be born to black parents.”

allthingseurope:

Old stone bridge in Burgundy, France (by Edgard.V)

allthingseurope:

Old stone bridge in Burgundy, France (by Edgard.V)