There's No Present Like the Time
SEARCH

ABOUT
Do you like apples?...
Well I got your number



How do you like them apples?!

Penny For Your Thoughts

LINKS

  1. That’s the view from Blvd East while riding the bus to NY.
  2. Some street wisdom in the Bronx.
  3. E. Tremont. Just four blocks from the Bronx Zoo which sadly :( didn’t have the chance to go to.
  4. The fluffiest of clouds in the sky waiting for the 2 train.
  5. A small green space on 125th and Malcolm X. That supper pointy church is Ephesus Church on 123rd.
wonderwonderwoman:

the painting that resulted from the time lapse video

excuse the crooked-ness im being lazy ha

wonderwonderwoman:

the painting that resulted from the time lapse video

excuse the crooked-ness im being lazy ha

nerdsandcupcakes:

The sky this evening. Whoa.

nerdsandcupcakes:

The sky this evening. Whoa.

ritajphoto:

yesterday’s rainbow over NYC
Liberty State Park, NJ

ritajphoto:

yesterday’s rainbow over NYC

Liberty State Park, NJ

ritajphoto:

And some more clouds! Because why not.

(better viewed large)

erada:

Death Valley Salt Flats | 2011

erada:

Death Valley Salt Flats | 2011

mightythings:

NASA

mightythings:

NASA

(Source: asaya)

discoverynews:

Tubular Cloud Rolls Toward Horizon
A photo taken near Brazil captures a rare and beautiful “roll cloud,” a tubular cloud that seems to tumble across the sky.
Roll clouds are a type of arcus cloud, which is a category of low cloud formations. Their more common cousin is the shelf cloud, often seen on the leading edges of thunderstorms. Roll clouds sometimes form along with storms, too, born out of the storm’s downdraft. Sinking cold air causes warm, moist air on the planet’s surface to climb to higher altitudes, where the moisture condenses into cloud form. Winds from the storm “roll” the cloud parallel to the horizon, creating an effect that looks much like a horizontal tornado. Unlike shelf clouds, rolls clouds are completely detached from the bulk of the storm. (Gallery of Curious Clouds)
keep reading
photo by Capt. Andreas M. van der Wurff

discoverynews:

Tubular Cloud Rolls Toward Horizon

A photo taken near Brazil captures a rare and beautiful “roll cloud,” a tubular cloud that seems to tumble across the sky.

Roll clouds are a type of arcus cloud, which is a category of low cloud formations. Their more common cousin is the shelf cloud, often seen on the leading edges of thunderstorms. Roll clouds sometimes form along with storms, too, born out of the storm’s downdraft. Sinking cold air causes warm, moist air on the planet’s surface to climb to higher altitudes, where the moisture condenses into cloud form. Winds from the storm “roll” the cloud parallel to the horizon, creating an effect that looks much like a horizontal tornado. Unlike shelf clouds, rolls clouds are completely detached from the bulk of the storm. (Gallery of Curious Clouds)

keep reading

photo by Capt. Andreas M. van der Wurff

erada:

Death Valley Salt Flats | 2011

erada:

Death Valley Salt Flats | 2011

(Source: gayconfucius)

the-absolute-best-photography:

You have to follow this blog, it’s really awesome!

the-absolute-best-photography:

You have to follow this blog, it’s really awesome!

(Source: habanerocollective)

csebastian:

photographer: Alison Scarpulla

Alison Scarpulla’s Portfolio

// comme-cicomme-ca:fiftyfivethousand

(Source: day-dreamerr)