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laboratoryequipment:

Web Star Physics Professor to Teach MillionsEdX, the not-for-profit online learning initiative founded by Harvard Univ. and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), announced today a new course from the legendary professor Walter Lewin who, for 47 years, has provided generations of MIT students – and millions watching online – with his inspiring and unconventional lectures. Now, with this edX version of Lewin’s famous course Electricity and Magnetism (Physics), people around the world can experience it just like his students on the MIT campus. MITx 8.02x Electricity and Magnetism is now open for enrollment and classes will begin on February 18, 2013.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/web-star-physics-professor-teach-millions

laboratoryequipment:

Web Star Physics Professor to Teach Millions

EdX, the not-for-profit online learning initiative founded by Harvard Univ. and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), announced today a new course from the legendary professor Walter Lewin who, for 47 years, has provided generations of MIT students – and millions watching online – with his inspiring and unconventional lectures. Now, with this edX version of Lewin’s famous course Electricity and Magnetism (Physics), people around the world can experience it just like his students on the MIT campus. MITx 8.02x Electricity and Magnetism is now open for enrollment and classes will begin on February 18, 2013.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/01/web-star-physics-professor-teach-millions

sagansense:

Picture of the Big Bang (a.k.a. Oldest Light in the Universe)
via minutephysics

imageIn this interview on The Great Discontent, the inimitable Debbie Millman (who is newly on SoundCloud!) offers five pieces of advice for young people starting out in any creative field – a fine addition to our running record of sage advice.

Complement with Neil Gaiman’s advice on the creative life and treat yourself to Millman’s sublime Look Both Ways: Illustrated Essays on the Intersection of Life and Design.

(via explore-blog)

incensesoakedsoul:

incensesoakedsoul:

incensesoakedsoul:

My name is Kelsey, and I’m a 20-year-old college student in Florida. I still live at home with my parents, because due to a car accident I was in over the summer, I’m a risk to employ. I now have two bulging discs in my spine, and most jobs require you to be able to lift at least 50lbs, which I can’t. Both of my parents are disabled—my dad has had three brain surgeries, and my mom had to have her hip replaced as well as a spinal surgery because of a car accident she was in. Because of this, they had to use any and all of the money they set aside for me for college. We also just lost food stamps because we are $18 over the limit, which is also why I can no longer receive financial aid. I just want to go back to classes for the spring semester and continue working towards my journalism degree, but I’m unable to do it on my own. I’m still going to continue applying to jobs and selling what I can, but I don’t think it’s going to be enough. 

I have until January 7th to pay my fee, and I would really appreciate the help. 

Make donations here: http://www.gofundme.com/1n76lc

There’s also a Paypal donation button on my blog for donations under $5.00.

Did I mention I only need $402.00 because I only want to take one class? And that I will write poetry/do a song cover/do art for anyone that donates if they want? I’m really desperate and I just want to go back to school.

My deadline is Monday, and I just had to spend $70 on the book for the course. (At least this way if I can’t afford to take the course, I can still study the material.)

I got an extension by pleading desperately with the administrator.
I now have until the 20th! 

kateoplis:


In 1971, the tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan introduced a model of measuring prosperity not by GDP but through Gross National Happiness (GNH), a system of governance based on four pillars: equitable social development, cultural preservation, conservation of the environment, and promotion of good governance. In 2009, the GNH model began to be integrated into the education system through the Green Schools for Green Bhutan initiative. 

Schools in Bhutan are being encouraged to put the principles of GNH at the heart of education in an effort to make learning more relevant, thoughtful and aligned with sustainable practices. The government has introduced a GNH-based national curriculum, and Unicef Bhutan has funded a training programme for headteachers to help schools implement the scheme at classroom level.
The Jigme Losel primary school in the capital, Thimphu, is considered a model of the green schools mindset. The school has introduced practical programmes, including basic agricultural skills, to teach the more than 800 pupils about conservation. Each class has its own tree to care for, and there is a communal vegetable patch and flower garden for the children to manage. The school runs a sustainable food programme feeding low-income students and their families.
Children are taught about conserving natural resources, climate change and the dangers of deforestation and pollution. ‘Most of our country is mountainous, but here in the city I think the children can feel disconnected,’ headteacher Choki Dukpa says. ‘Environmental protection is enshrined in our constitution, but young children have to learn why it is important to protect the environment and how the country’s future prosperity depends on its conservation’. [photo]
‘Let nature be your teacher’ | Guardian

kateoplis:

In 1971, the tiny Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan introduced a model of measuring prosperity not by GDP but through Gross National Happiness (GNH), a system of governance based on four pillars: equitable social development, cultural preservation, conservation of the environment, and promotion of good governance. In 2009, the GNH model began to be integrated into the education system through the Green Schools for Green Bhutan initiative. 

Schools in Bhutan are being encouraged to put the principles of GNH at the heart of education in an effort to make learning more relevant, thoughtful and aligned with sustainable practices. The government has introduced a GNH-based national curriculum, and Unicef Bhutan has funded a training programme for headteachers to help schools implement the scheme at classroom level.
The Jigme Losel primary school in the capital, Thimphu, is considered a model of the green schools mindset. The school has introduced practical programmes, including basic agricultural skills, to teach the more than 800 pupils about conservation. Each class has its own tree to care for, and there is a communal vegetable patch and flower garden for the children to manage. The school runs a sustainable food programme feeding low-income students and their families.
Children are taught about conserving natural resources, climate change and the dangers of deforestation and pollution. ‘Most of our country is mountainous, but here in the city I think the children can feel disconnected,’ headteacher Choki Dukpa says. ‘Environmental protection is enshrined in our constitution, but young children have to learn why it is important to protect the environment and how the country’s future prosperity depends on its conservation’. [photo]

‘Let nature be your teacher’ | Guardian

sagansense:

According to Bill Nye, if you stop exploring, you’re not going to move forward as a species. Your country’s economy will also fall behind. After all, space exploration stimulates the economy, since it is a so-called “trickle-up” investment.

sagansense:

Heart of Glass: The Art of Medical Models

Gary Farlow can make art out of arteries. He and his team of 10 at Farlow’s Scientific Glassblowing are able to transform the body’s vasculature—and nearly all of its other parts—into an ornate borosilicate glass sculpture, from the heart’s ventricles to the brain’s circle of Willis. “We do almost every part of the body,” Farlow says. “It can take a pretty artistic mind to make some of these things.” With the help of cardiologists, the team creates custom see-through systems for science and medical training. Their anatomically correct models can be designed to simulate blood flow, teach placement of catheters and angioplasty devices, or simply test or demo new surgical gizmos. Individual arteries, veins, and capillaries are shaped and fused together, one at a time. Ground-glass joints are added at the exposed ends so a head, say, can be connected to the carotid arteries should customers want to expand their model. A full-body setup could cost $25,000, so don’t get any bright ideas about using one as a brandy decanter.

thinkphreely:

“Changing Education Paradigms” — Sir Ken Robinson

YES. YES. YES. YES. YES. 

kateoplis:

Classrooms around the World | Guardian (click through for vital stats)

thescienceofreality:

More FREE Online Courses available to everyone, in addition to the plethora of Coursera courses.

Even outside of Coursera, the number of college classes available on a computer screen rather than in a brick-and-mortar lecture hall is staggering. At TEDxEastside Prep, Scott Young gave the intriguing talk — “Can you get an MIT education for $2,000?” — in which he shared his effort to get an MIT education in computer science by taking the school’s Open Courseware free online courses. The result? He’s currently taken — as well as passed exams and completed programming assignments for – 20 of the 33 courses in schools’ curriculum.

Inspired by Young, after the jump, find 12 courses you could take for a completely free TED degree in Big Ideas.”

The Course: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
The School: Stanford, via YouTube
Taught By: Peter Norvig, Sebastian Thrun Course Description: “Artificial Intelligence is the science of making computer software that reasons about the world around it. Humanoid robots, Google Goggles, self-driving cars, even software that suggests music you might like to hear are all examples of AI. In this class, you will learn how to create this software from two of the leaders in the field. Notes: When Thrun and Norvig first put this course online in the fall of 2011, 160,000 students from 209 countries enrolled. While the course is closed, you can still watch the lectures on YouTube. And see Norvig discuss what he learned teaching the course in the TEDTalk, “The 100,000 student classroom.” “

The Course: The Structure of English Words
The School: Stanford, via iTunes
Taught By: Will Leben Course Description: “Thanks to historical, cultural, and linguistic factors, English has by far the world’s largest vocabulary—leading many of us to have greater than average difficulty with words, and some of us to have greater than average curiosity about words. Our historical and linguistic study will cover both erudite and everyday English, with special attention to word meaning and word use, to both rules and exceptions. Most words originated with an image. “Reveal” = “pull back the veil,” “depend” = “hang down from.” Change is constant. “Girl” once meant “a young child of either sex;” an early synonym for “stupid” was “nice.” Are there good changes and bad ones? And who gets to decide?”

The Course: Physics for Future Presidents
The School: University of California Berkeley, via YouTube
Taught By: Richard A. Muller and Bob Jacobsen Course Description: “Contains the essential physics that students need in order to understand today’s core science and technology issues, and to become the next generation of world leaders. From the physics of energy to climate change, and from spy technology to quantum computers, this is a look at the modern physics affecting the decisions of political leaders and CEOs and, consequently, the lives of every citizen. How practical are alternative energy sources? Can satellites really read license plates from space? What is the quantum physics behind iPods and supermarket scanners? And how much should we fear a terrorist nuke?” Note: A complete guide is available to anyone who wants to teach the class at their university.”


The Course: Dilemmas in Bio-Medical Ethics: Playing God or Doing Good?
The School: MIT, via Open Courseware
Taught By: Erica James Course Description: “This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of bio-medical ethics. It examines moral foundations of the science and practice of western bio-medicine through case studies of abortion, contraception, cloning, organ transplantation, and other issues. It also evaluates challenges that new medical technologies pose to the practice and availability of medical services around the globe, and to cross-cultural ideas of kinship and personhood. It discusses critiques of the bio-medical tradition from anthropological, feminist, legal, religious, and cross-cultural theorists.”

The Course: Videogame Theory and Analysis
The School: MIT, via Open Courseware
Taught By: Alice Robison Course Description: “This course will serve as an introduction to the interdisciplinary academic study of videogames, examining their cultural, educational, and social functions in contemporary settings. By playing, analyzing, and reading and writing about videogames, we will examine debates surrounding how they function within socially situated contexts in order to better understand games’ influence on and reflections of society.”

The Course: Sets, Counting and Probability
The School: Harvard, via the Open Learning Initiative
Taught By: Paul G. Bamberg Course Description: “This online math course develops the mathematics needed to formulate and analyze probability models for idealized situations drawn from everyday life. Topics include elementary set theory, techniques for systematic counting, axioms for probability, conditional probability, discrete random variables, infinite geometric series, and random walks. Applications to card games like bridge and poker, to gambling, to sports, to election results, and to inference in fields like history and genealogy, national security, and theology.”

The Course: Introduction to Aerospace Engineering and Design
The School: MIT, via Open Courseware
Taught By: Dava Newman Course Description: “The fundamental concepts, and approaches of aerospace engineering, are highlighted through lectures on aeronautics, astronautics, and design. Active learning aerospace modules make use of information technology. Student teams are immersed in a hands-on, lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicle design project, where they design, build, and fly radio-controlled LTA vehicles. The connections between theory and practice are realized in the design exercises.”

The Course: Shakespeare After All: The Later Plays
The School: Harvard
Taught By: Marjorie Garber Course Description: “This free online Shakespeare course focuses on Shakespeare’s later plays beginning with Measure for Measure and ending with The Tempest. This course takes note of key themes, issues, and interpretations of the plays, focusing on questions of genre, gender, politics, family relations, silence and speech, and cultural power from both above and below (royalty, nobility, and the court; clowns and fools).”

The Course: Securing Digital Democracy
The School: University of Michigan, via Coursera
Taught By: J. Alex Halderman Course Description: “Computer technology has transformed how we participate in democracy. The way we cast our votes, the way our votes are counted, and the way we choose who will lead are increasingly controlled by invisible computer software. Most U.S. states have adopted electronic voting, and countries around the world are starting to collect votes over the Internet. However, computerized voting raises startling security risks that are only beginning to be understood outside the research lab, from voting machine viruses that can silently change votes to the possibility that hackers in foreign countries could steal an election. This course will provide the technical background and public policy foundation that 21st century citizens need to understand the electronic voting debate. You’ll come away from this course understanding why you can be confident your own vote will count — or why you should reasonably be skeptical.”

The CourseGalaxies and Cosmology
The School: California Institute of Technology, via Coursera
Taught By: S. George Djorgovski Course Description: “This class is an introduction to the modern extragalactic astronomy and cosmology, i.e., the part of astrophysics that deals with the structure and evolution of the universe as a whole. It will cover the subjects including: relativistic cosmological models and their parameters, extragalactic distance scale, cosmological tests, composition of the universe, dark matter, and dark energy; the hot big bang, cosmic nucleosynthesis, recombination, and cosmic microwave background; formation and evolution of structure in the universe; galaxy clusters, large-scale structure and its evolution; galaxies, their properties and fundamental correlations; formation and evolution of galaxies; star formation history of the universe; quasars and other active galactic nuclei, and their evolution; structure and evolution of the intergalactic medium; diffuse extragalactic backgrounds; the first stars, galaxies, and the reionization era.”

The Course: Fantasy and Science Fiction: The Human Mind, Our Modern World
The School: University of Michigan, via Coursera
Taught By: Eric Rabkin Course Description: “Fantasy is a key term both in psychology and in the art and artifice of humanity. The things we make, including our stories, reflect, serve, and often shape our needs and desires. We see this everywhere from fairy tale to kiddie lit to myth; from “Cinderella” to Alice in Wonderland to Superman; from building a fort as a child to building ideal, planned cities as whole societies. Fantasy in ways both entertaining and practical serves our persistent needs and desires and illuminates the human mind. Fantasy expresses itself in many ways, from the comfort we feel in the godlike powers of a fairy godmother to the seductive unease we feel confronting Dracula. This course will explore Fantasy in general and Science Fiction in specific both as art and as insights into ourselves and our world.”

The Course: Bits: The Computer Science of Digital Information
The School: Harvard, via the Open Learning Initiative
Taught By: Harry R. Lewis Course Description: “This course focuses on information as quantity, resource, and property. We study the application of quantitative methods to understanding how information technologies inform issues of public policy, regulation, and law. How are music, images, and telephone conversations represented digitally, and how are they moved reliably from place to place through wires, glass fibers, and the air? Who owns information, who owns software, what forms of regulation and law restrict the communication and use of information, and does it matter? How can personal privacy be protected at the same time that society benefits from communicated or shared information?”

Happy mind expanding, enjoy!!

jtotheizzoe:

“RADICAL OPENNESS”

An epic ode to the power of sharing ideas produced for TEDGlobal 2012 by Jason Silva. The power of human thought, and the tools it renders, so humanity evolves onward.

Wow, indeed, Jason. Wow, indeed. :)

thedailywhat:

Graduation Gift of the Day: Here’s the story behind newly minted grad Brenna Martini and the best-kept secret EVER.

I graduated High School this week. When my Dad said he had a present for me I thought I was getting some cheesy graduation card. But what I received was something truly priceless.
Following the ceremony he handed me a bag with a copy of Oh the Places You’ll Go, by Doctor Seuss inside. At first I just smiled and said that it meant a lot and that I loved that book. But then he told me “No, open it up.”
…On the first page I see a short paragraph written by none other than my kindergarten teacher. I start tearing up but I’m still confused.
He tells me “Every year, for the past 13 years, since the day you started kindergarten I’ve gotten every teacher, coach, and principal to write a little something about you inside this book.”
He managed to keep this book a secret for 13 years, and apparently everyone else in my life knew about it!
Yes the intended effect occured… I burst out in tears. Sitting there reading through this book there are encouraging and sweet words from every teacher I love and remember through my years in this small town. My early teachers mention my “Pigtails and giggles,” while my high school teachers mention my “Wit and sharp thinking..” But they all mention my humor and love for life.
is astounding to receive something this moving, touching, nostalgic, and thoughtful. I can’t express how much I love my Dad for this labor of love.

[nedhardy]

thedailywhat:

Graduation Gift of the Day: Here’s the story behind newly minted grad Brenna Martini and the best-kept secret EVER.

I graduated High School this week. When my Dad said he had a present for me I thought I was getting some cheesy graduation card. But what I received was something truly priceless.

Following the ceremony he handed me a bag with a copy of Oh the Places You’ll Go, by Doctor Seuss inside. At first I just smiled and said that it meant a lot and that I loved that book. But then he told me “No, open it up.”

…On the first page I see a short paragraph written by none other than my kindergarten teacher. I start tearing up but I’m still confused.

He tells me “Every year, for the past 13 years, since the day you started kindergarten I’ve gotten every teacher, coach, and principal to write a little something about you inside this book.”

He managed to keep this book a secret for 13 years, and apparently everyone else in my life knew about it!

Yes the intended effect occured… I burst out in tears. Sitting there reading through this book there are encouraging and sweet words from every teacher I love and remember through my years in this small town. My early teachers mention my “Pigtails and giggles,” while my high school teachers mention my “Wit and sharp thinking..” But they all mention my humor and love for life.

is astounding to receive something this moving, touching, nostalgic, and thoughtful. I can’t express how much I love my Dad for this labor of love.

[nedhardy]

Tag(s): #Education
barackobama:

Tick-tock, Congress.

barackobama:

Tick-tock, Congress.

fastcompany:

TED, the conference dedicated to “Ideas Worth Spreading,” took a step forward in its educational mission today by launching a TEDEd video channel on YouTube. Shorter than the 18-minute TED talks that have racked up 500 million views, these videos feature a combination of talking heads from TED stages and animation (artwork by Fast Company Most Creative Person Sunni Brown, among others) tackling topics like neuroscience and evolution for a high-school-aged audience.
Learn more->

fastcompany:

TED, the conference dedicated to “Ideas Worth Spreading,” took a step forward in its educational mission today by launching a TEDEd video channel on YouTube. Shorter than the 18-minute TED talks that have racked up 500 million views, these videos feature a combination of talking heads from TED stages and animation (artwork by Fast Company Most Creative Person Sunni Brown, among others) tackling topics like neuroscience and evolution for a high-school-aged audience.

Learn more->

wickedclothes:

The World’s Largest Scrabble Game
Spanning over 49 square feet, this is the world’s largest wall-mounted Scrabble game. One of only nine in existence, it is handmade by John Kahn, renowned mixed media artist and creator of colossal pop art. Sold at Hammacher.
Please check out Wicked Clothes on Facebook and Tumblr!

wickedclothes:

The World’s Largest Scrabble Game

Spanning over 49 square feet, this is the world’s largest wall-mounted Scrabble game. One of only nine in existence, it is handmade by John Kahn, renowned mixed media artist and creator of colossal pop art. Sold at Hammacher.

Please check out Wicked Clothes on Facebook and Tumblr!

Tag(s): #Education