There's No Present Like the Time
SEARCH

ABOUT
Do you like apples?... Well I got your number How do you like them apples?!

Penny For Your Thoughts

LINKS

science-junkie:

First algae powered building goes up in Hamburg
A 15-unit apartment building has been constructed in the German city of Hamburg that has 129 algae filled louvered tanks hanging over the exterior of the south-east and south-west sides of the building—making it the first in the world to be powered exclusively by algae. Designed by Arup, SSC Strategic Science Consultants and Splitterwerk Architects, and named the Bio Intelligent Quotient (BIQ) House, the building demonstrates the ability to use algae as a way to heat and cool large buildings.
Read more

science-junkie:

First algae powered building goes up in Hamburg

A 15-unit apartment building has been constructed in the German city of Hamburg that has 129 algae filled louvered tanks hanging over the exterior of the south-east and south-west sides of the building—making it the first in the world to be powered exclusively by algae. Designed by Arup, SSC Strategic Science Consultants and Splitterwerk Architects, and named the Bio Intelligent Quotient (BIQ) House, the building demonstrates the ability to use algae as a way to heat and cool large buildings.

Read more

photojojo:

Win great stuff from the Photojojo Shop & CanvasPop! We didn’t want to exclude anyone, so you get to choose from a DSLR prize pack or a phoneography prize pack.
Today’s the last day to enter!
Enter to Win a DSLR or Phoneography Prize Pack

photojojo:

Win great stuff from the Photojojo Shop & CanvasPop! We didn’t want to exclude anyone, so you get to choose from a DSLR prize pack or a phoneography prize pack.

Today’s the last day to enter!

Enter to Win a DSLR or Phoneography Prize Pack

welovephoneography:

This little periscope-looking thing is a camera eyepiece for your iPhone!
The iPhone Viewfinder pretty much gives your phone a viewfinder like the one your other cameras have.
It suctions to your phone’s screen and works with an app to help you frame your shot. It’s especially helpful for shooting on bright days!
The iPhone Viewfinder Adds an Eyepiece to Your iPhone

welovephoneography:

This little periscope-looking thing is a camera eyepiece for your iPhone!

The iPhone Viewfinder pretty much gives your phone a viewfinder like the one your other cameras have.

It suctions to your phone’s screen and works with an app to help you frame your shot. It’s especially helpful for shooting on bright days!

The iPhone Viewfinder Adds an Eyepiece to Your iPhone

8bitfuture:

Update on Google Glasses.
Babak Parviz, head of Project Glass at Google has given an interview updating some of the progress since they were first shown off Mid-2012.
Among other information, he describes how the glasses are currently controlled:


Right now, we have a touch pad on the device that allows people to change things on the device if they wish to do so. We have also experimented a lot with using voice commands. We have full audio in and audio out, which is a nice, natural way of interacting with something that you’d wear and always have with you. We have also experimented with some head gestures.


Check out the full interview here.

8bitfuture:

Update on Google Glasses.

Babak Parviz, head of Project Glass at Google has given an interview updating some of the progress since they were first shown off Mid-2012.

Among other information, he describes how the glasses are currently controlled:

Right now, we have a touch pad on the device that allows people to change things on the device if they wish to do so. We have also experimented a lot with using voice commands. We have full audio in and audio out, which is a nice, natural way of interacting with something that you’d wear and always have with you. We have also experimented with some head gestures.

Check out the full interview here.

kateoplis:

Why Can’t We Have Glow-in-the-Dark Highways Like the Netherlands? 

“It’s one thing for the rest of the world to have way cooler trains than us. America has chosen car culture, for better or worse. But now comes word that the Netherlands is building way awesomer highways, while ours are stuck in the 20th Century. The Netherlands! If this isn’t a wake-up call for the United States to invest more in infrastructure, I don’t know what is. (OK, maybe this.)

Wired UK reported in October that the Dutch design firm Studio Roosegaarde and infrastructure management group Heijmans have come up with a “smart highway” concept that will replace standard road markings with photoluminescent powder that charges in the daylight and glows through the night. When the temperature drops below freezing, the road will automatically light up with snowflake indicators to warn drivers of possible ice, sort of like the Coors beer cans that turn blue when they’re extra cold.

Whether any of that will actually make drivers safer remains to be seen. (Personally, I’d rather see these guys collaborate with Coors on a special paint that makes cars glow in the dark when their drivers are full of alcohol.) The Netherlands is wisely starting small, with a pilot project in the province of Brabant scheduled to begin later this year. But those are only the first two stages of the grand Dutch plan to put our highways to shame. The next steps include windmills that light up as cars pass by, and “induction lanes” that would charge electric cars while they drive. … [video]

The design firm behind the project says it would like to bring the concept to the United States eventually, but Americans shouldn’t hold their breath. Current levels of infrastructure spending are barely sufficient to maintain our “D” grade from the American Society of Civil Engineers and our 23rd-place global ranking from the World Economic Forum.” 

Tag(s): #tech
photojojo:

Have you ever wanted to brave the elements and photograph in the rain? It’s a situation most folks tend to avoid, but Cnet’s Hack Attack showed us a brilliant way to keep your baby safe! Check out the vid for the how-to.
DIY - Build A Rain Poncho for Your DSLR
via Reddit

photojojo:

Have you ever wanted to brave the elements and photograph in the rain? It’s a situation most folks tend to avoid, but Cnet’s Hack Attack showed us a brilliant way to keep your baby safe! Check out the vid for the how-to.

DIY - Build A Rain Poncho for Your DSLR

via Reddit

photojojo:

This Macro Lens Band is a macro lens that works with any phone!

Android, iPhone 4, iPhone 5. If your dad’s 20 lb. cellular telephone from the 90s had a lens, it’d work with that, too.

Just put it around your phone, line it up with your lens, and you’re ready to shoot photos of the insanely minute details. Your Instagram buddies will be so jealz.

The Macro Lens Band Works with Any Phone

discoverynews:

iammikewilson:

The HAL exoskeleton from Cyberdyne. 

This week Cyberdyne unveiled a robotic exoskeleton called HAL (Hybrid Assistive Limb) that allows its wearer to carry superhuman loads while shielding them from radiation. With the Fukushima nuclear disaster still fresh in Japan’s national memory, the research team designed HAL to aid workers in dismantling the damaged power plant. The most incredible part is that the suit can be controlled by brainwaves! A network of sensors monitors electric signals coming from the user’s brain and uses them to activate the robot’s limbs in unison with the worker’s, allowing them to move without supporting the suit’s weight. As such, the 130-pound suit is barely noticeable to those wearing it.


Tony Stark: “Tell you what. Throw a little hotrod red in there.” Jarvis: “Yes, that should help you keep a low profile.”

discoverynews:

iammikewilson:

The HAL exoskeleton from Cyberdyne. 

This week Cyberdyne unveiled a robotic exoskeleton called HAL (Hybrid Assistive Limb) that allows its wearer to carry superhuman loads while shielding them from radiation. With the Fukushima nuclear disaster still fresh in Japan’s national memory, the research team designed HAL to aid workers in dismantling the damaged power plant. The most incredible part is that the suit can be controlled by brainwaves! A network of sensors monitors electric signals coming from the user’s brain and uses them to activate the robot’s limbs in unison with the worker’s, allowing them to move without supporting the suit’s weight. As such, the 130-pound suit is barely noticeable to those wearing it.

Tony Stark: “Tell you what. Throw a little hotrod red in there.”
Jarvis: “Yes, that should help you keep a low profile.”

photojojo:

Cute! This Kickstarter camera reminds us of the Autographer!

You just wear it, and it takes the photos for you with the aim to document your day.

The Memoto - a Lifelogging Camera

via Laughing Squid

ikenbot:

Stop Building Bombs and Start Building Starships
Side Note: To go where no human has gone before.. this may come off as a lengthy read but I would definitely recommend it to any follower who is either into futurism or at least has an interest in where our future ought to head. Scientific American guest blogger Steven P. discusses how science and our ever developing technologies can really take us into an age of space exploration. So give it a read or save it on the blog for later, I definitely enjoyed it myself. But then again I’m always up for some interstellar space travel.
Illustration: ‘The Fleet Advances’ by newcmd001
by Steven Ross Pomeroy
In 1969, a great shadow was cast over the United States. That shadow, however, was not one of gloom. Instead of evoking the absence of light, this shadow caused us to look up in wonder at the brightness that created it. When the Saturn V Rocket propelling Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins dashed across the blue, cloud-splotched sky, we did not see a dark present. We glimpsed a bright future.
Elsewhere, however, truly ominous shadows were cast by rockets which never saw the sun. Nestled in silos and buried beneath barren landscapes, “Minuteman” missiles meant not to uplift man, but to deliver the end of man, shrouded much of our world in trepidation.
These two rockets, with two very distinct purposes, bring into focus a problem that has long plagued our nation. We spend far too much money on war, and not enough on science.
Considering that we are nearing the ominously titled “fiscal cliff” — a series of government spending cuts and tax increases that will automatically take effect if Congress and the President do not act to stop it — we have a unique opportunity to review Federal spending and ensure that we are investing our time and wealth to their most productive ends.
I argue that such a review – if guided by reason – would reveal that defense spending should be reduced in order to make way for a world-changing commitment to science and technology, a bold move that will put both the United States and the world on a path to a bright future.
As it stands today, the United States is clearly over militarized. Defense spending in 2011 was estimated at $711 Billion. That’s equal to the combined budgets of the next fourteen top-spending countries, over half of whom are strong U.S. allies. Moreover, a 2011 Government Accountability Office audit of defense spending found that a combined $70 billion was wasted in 2010 and 2009.
This over-the-top spending is indicative of a military-industrial-complex run amok, precisely the scenario that President Dwight D. Eisenhower, perhaps the most revered military commander of the 20th century, warned against in his farewell address. “Together, we must learn how to compose differences not with arms, but with intellect and decent purpose,” he avowed.
I can think of no better way to fulfill Eisenhower’s vision than through the pursuit of science.
By intelligently, purposefully, and gradually drawing down the defense budget from 4.7% to 3.0% of GDP (from $709 to $453 billion), and diverting some of those funds to meaningful science projects of both national and global significance, the United States can accomplish the essential goal of protecting its citizens, while simultaneously making the world a safer, healthier place and reinvigorating our economy.
We can begin the funding transition at home by re-committing ourselves to NASA. If we double the space agency’s budget (currently at $17.8 billion), our space accomplishments in ten years will dwarf even the monumental success of this summer, when the Curiosity rover landed on Mars.
We can complete the James Webb Space Telescope, allowing us to peer farther into the Universe than ever before. We can go to Mars by the end of the decade, a mission which astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson insists “would reboot America’s capacity to innovate as no other force in society can.” And with the recent news that warp drive may be more feasible than originally thought, we can focus on researching and eventually engineering interstellar starships that could one day take humans to Gliese 581 g — a potentially habitable Earth-like planet — in a mere two years. Along the way we could solve a myriad of other problems, writes Space.com’s Clara Moskowitz:
“…if human beings can solve the challenges of interstellar spaceflight, in the process they will have solved many of the problems plaguing Earth today, experts said. For example, building a starship will require figuring out how to conserve and recycle resources, how to structure societies for the common well-being, and how to harness and use energy sustainably.”
In addition to funding NASA, we can make fusion energy research a top national priority. Fusion power – an unparalleled energy source that generates electricity by effectively creating a miniature star – has eluded scientists for decades, but researchers now believe that successful fusion is within mankind’s grasp. Before the year is out, scientists at the National Ignition Facility in California hope to fire the world’s most powerful laser into a small test chamber with pea-sized fuel pellets of deuterium and tritium inside. The two isotopes of hydrogen will fuse together and potentially create up to one hundred times more energy than was used to ignite the fuel.
This breakthrough could serve as our “Sputnik Moment” for energy production. If we can put a man on the Moon a mere eight years after deciding to do so, then surely we can master “star power” if we pledge ourselves to the task. Fusion produces no carbon emissions, could provide power for thousands of years, is estimated to be cost-competitive with coal, and is unquestionably the energy source of the future. Yet despite the impressive resumé, fusion energy research is only allotted a relatively paltry $474.6 million.
Why wait for the future to happen later? With additional spending freedom by making cuts in defense, we can fund fusion and make that future happen now.
Continue over at SciAm

ikenbot:

Stop Building Bombs and Start Building Starships

Side Note: To go where no human has gone before.. this may come off as a lengthy read but I would definitely recommend it to any follower who is either into futurism or at least has an interest in where our future ought to head. Scientific American guest blogger Steven P. discusses how science and our ever developing technologies can really take us into an age of space exploration. So give it a read or save it on the blog for later, I definitely enjoyed it myself. But then again I’m always up for some interstellar space travel.

Illustration: ‘The Fleet Advances’ by newcmd001

by Steven Ross Pomeroy

In 1969, a great shadow was cast over the United States. That shadow, however, was not one of gloom. Instead of evoking the absence of light, this shadow caused us to look up in wonder at the brightness that created it. When the Saturn V Rocket propelling Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins dashed across the blue, cloud-splotched sky, we did not see a dark present. We glimpsed a bright future.

Elsewhere, however, truly ominous shadows were cast by rockets which never saw the sun. Nestled in silos and buried beneath barren landscapes, “Minuteman” missiles meant not to uplift man, but to deliver the end of man, shrouded much of our world in trepidation.

These two rockets, with two very distinct purposes, bring into focus a problem that has long plagued our nation. We spend far too much money on war, and not enough on science.

Considering that we are nearing the ominously titled “fiscal cliff” — a series of government spending cuts and tax increases that will automatically take effect if Congress and the President do not act to stop it — we have a unique opportunity to review Federal spending and ensure that we are investing our time and wealth to their most productive ends.

I argue that such a review – if guided by reason – would reveal that defense spending should be reduced in order to make way for a world-changing commitment to science and technology, a bold move that will put both the United States and the world on a path to a bright future.

As it stands today, the United States is clearly over militarized. Defense spending in 2011 was estimated at $711 Billion. That’s equal to the combined budgets of the next fourteen top-spending countries, over half of whom are strong U.S. allies. Moreover, a 2011 Government Accountability Office audit of defense spending found that a combined $70 billion was wasted in 2010 and 2009.

This over-the-top spending is indicative of a military-industrial-complex run amok, precisely the scenario that President Dwight D. Eisenhower, perhaps the most revered military commander of the 20th century, warned against in his farewell address. “Together, we must learn how to compose differences not with arms, but with intellect and decent purpose,” he avowed.

I can think of no better way to fulfill Eisenhower’s vision than through the pursuit of science.

By intelligently, purposefully, and gradually drawing down the defense budget from 4.7% to 3.0% of GDP (from $709 to $453 billion), and diverting some of those funds to meaningful science projects of both national and global significance, the United States can accomplish the essential goal of protecting its citizens, while simultaneously making the world a safer, healthier place and reinvigorating our economy.

We can begin the funding transition at home by re-committing ourselves to NASA. If we double the space agency’s budget (currently at $17.8 billion), our space accomplishments in ten years will dwarf even the monumental success of this summer, when the Curiosity rover landed on Mars.

We can complete the James Webb Space Telescope, allowing us to peer farther into the Universe than ever before. We can go to Mars by the end of the decade, a mission which astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson insists “would reboot America’s capacity to innovate as no other force in society can.” And with the recent news that warp drive may be more feasible than originally thought, we can focus on researching and eventually engineering interstellar starships that could one day take humans to Gliese 581 g — a potentially habitable Earth-like planet — in a mere two years. Along the way we could solve a myriad of other problems, writes Space.com’s Clara Moskowitz:

“…if human beings can solve the challenges of interstellar spaceflight, in the process they will have solved many of the problems plaguing Earth today, experts said. For example, building a starship will require figuring out how to conserve and recycle resources, how to structure societies for the common well-being, and how to harness and use energy sustainably.”

In addition to funding NASA, we can make fusion energy research a top national priority. Fusion power – an unparalleled energy source that generates electricity by effectively creating a miniature star – has eluded scientists for decades, but researchers now believe that successful fusion is within mankind’s grasp. Before the year is out, scientists at the National Ignition Facility in California hope to fire the world’s most powerful laser into a small test chamber with pea-sized fuel pellets of deuterium and tritium inside. The two isotopes of hydrogen will fuse together and potentially create up to one hundred times more energy than was used to ignite the fuel.

This breakthrough could serve as our “Sputnik Moment” for energy production. If we can put a man on the Moon a mere eight years after deciding to do so, then surely we can master “star power” if we pledge ourselves to the task. Fusion produces no carbon emissions, could provide power for thousands of years, is estimated to be cost-competitive with coal, and is unquestionably the energy source of the future. Yet despite the impressive resumé, fusion energy research is only allotted a relatively paltry $474.6 million.

Why wait for the future to happen later? With additional spending freedom by making cuts in defense, we can fund fusion and make that future happen now.

Continue over at SciAm

parislemon:

chartier:

Dan Peterson, our lead designer at AgileBits, updated his Steve Jobs iPhone wallpaper for the 5. The design is based on Jonathan Mak’s original art.

Nice.

parislemon:

chartier:

Dan Peterson, our lead designer at AgileBits, updated his Steve Jobs iPhone wallpaper for the 5. The design is based on Jonathan Mak’s original art.

Nice.

neurosciencestuff:

Britain’s first bionic veteran has a new brain-controlled robotic arm that is transforming his life.Andrew Garthwaite, 25, had his right arm blown clean off by a rocket-propelled grenade during a firefight with the Taliban in Afghanistan in September 2010. In January he had the state-of-the-art limb wired to his nervous system during a six-hour operation in Vienna, Austria.
Now he is getting to grips with his new body part and is able to ride his motorcycle and drive a car again. Mr Gathwaite, who lives with his new wife Kailey, also 25, in South Shields, Tyneside, said: ‘It’s been incredible. I thought I might never be the same. But my life is starting to get back to normal - I’m on my motorbike and I’m back in a car. I can do things that I never thought I would have been able to do’.

neurosciencestuff:

Britain’s first bionic veteran has a new brain-controlled robotic arm that is transforming his life.

Andrew Garthwaite, 25, had his right arm blown clean off by a rocket-propelled grenade during a firefight with the Taliban in Afghanistan in September 2010. In January he had the state-of-the-art limb wired to his nervous system during a six-hour operation in Vienna, Austria.

Now he is getting to grips with his new body part and is able to ride his motorcycle and drive a car again. Mr Gathwaite, who lives with his new wife Kailey, also 25, in South Shields, Tyneside, said:

‘It’s been incredible. I thought I might never be the same. But my life is starting to get back to normal - I’m on my motorbike and I’m back in a car. I can do things that I never thought I would have been able to do’.

photojojo:

We found it! The Slingshot is a tripod and hand-held stabilizer that works with any camera phone, case or no case.

The cradle hugs your phone in place, while the handle helps you stabilize. You can also unfold it to use it as a tripod!

The SlingShot — A Tripod & Hand-Held Stabilizer for Any Phone

photojojo:

What did Polaroid find when they looked into our digital-analog-loving soul? 

The Polaroid Z2300. 

It shoots digital photos at 10MP, and instantly prints them straight from the camera. The instant prints come with sticky backs, so you can stick your photos in your notebook or on your BFF’s FACE. 

The Polaroid Z2300 - a Digital Instant Cam for Sticky-Back Prints!

thescienceofreality:

Singapore’s Supertree-Powered Gardens By the Bay.

One of the largest horticultural attractions in the world, Singapore’s Gardens by the Bay, opens to the public Friday, June 29, 2012 offering a unique fusion of nature and technology.

Since we last reported on the project’s most distinctive element — 18 giant solar-powered, plant-growing “Supertrees” — UK-based landscape architects Grant Associates have released some stunning photos of the £500 million complex.”

Read more here and here.

[Photo Credit: Photos 1-3: © Craig Sheppard / Grant Associates. Photo 4: © Robert Such / Grant Associates. Photo 5: Jackerbie/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0. Photo 6: © Munshi Ahmed.]